The Great Detectives of Old Time Radio The great ones are back in action.

27Oct/140

EP1401: The Saint: The Case of the Blonde Who Lost Her Head

Vincent Prince

The Saint helps a beautiful blonde amnesiac who is a murder suspect.

Original Air Date: November 13, 1949

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20Oct/140

EP1395: The Saint: The Case of the Unhappy Homicide

Vincent Price
The owner of a jewelry store wants the Saint to prove he murdered his partner.

Original Air Date: November 6,1949

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13Oct/140

EP1389: The Saint: The Color Blind Killer

Vincent Price

The Saint tries to unravel a string of murders on a cruise ship.

Original Air Date: September 18, 1949

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6Oct/140

EP1383: The Saint: Greed Causes Murder

Vincent Price

The Saint investigates when a gangster is pressuring an old man to sell his jalopy to him.

Original Air Date: August 14, 1949

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29Sep/140

EP1377:The Saint: The Saint Goes Underground

Vincent Price
The Saint's plane lays over for repairs in a small New Mexico town where everyone is hinting he should leave if he cares about his health.

Original Air Date: July 31, 1949

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22Sep/140

EP1371: The Saint: Gangster District Attorney

Vincent Price

The Saint looks for the truth behind the rackets after a friend is murdered while investigate them

Original Air Date: October 15, 1947

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15Sep/140

EP1365: The Saint: The Miracle Tea Party

When the Saint discovers that there were several thousand dollar bill in a box of tea purchased by Inspector Fernack.

Audition Date: December 1944

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23Aug/140

Audio Review: BBC Crimes: The Saint Overboard & The Saint Plays with Fire

In late Summer 1995, the BBC brough the Saint back to radio in a series of three radio plays starring Paul Rhys as Simon Templar: The Saint.

The first two of these plays are collected in a single audio release, “The Saint Overboard” and “The Saint Plays With Fire.”

“The Saint Overboard” has the Saint teaming up with a female insurance investigator who is trying to catch the culprit behind the looting of sunken vessels. She has a suspect but has to find out where he’s hidden the loot.

“The Saint Plays with Fire” on the surface level is about an arson and murder investigation but it has strong political overtones in a story that was originally written right before the outbreak of World War II.

Of the two, “The Saint Overboard” is the weaker story. It’s not a bad tale, but it does drag a bit in the middle and some of the side characters were a little tedious. The Saint also plays much more of an anti-hero in the story.

“The Saint Plays With a Fire” is a much more solid play. It’s a good mystery and the pre-war setting is pretty intriguing.

Overall, Paul Rhys is decent as the Saint. He’s definitely not going to make anyone forget George Sanders, Roger Moore, or Vincent Price, but he does a good job. He’s certainly not Val Kilmer and he’s a cut above Hugh Sinclair who replaced Sanders as the on-screen Saint in the 1940s.

The rest of the cast turns in exactly the type of solid performance you’d expect from the BBC. While it’s not a must-hear for fans of Leslie Charteris’ most famous creation, it’s still a well-done adaptation.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5.0

This production is available from audible.com.

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5Jul/142

Film Review: The Saint (1996)

This film attempts to remake and update Leslie Charteris' character of Simon Templar (aka: The Saint.) In this modern setting, the Saint is still a criminal who hasn't gone straight and finds himself entangled in issues in post-Soviet Russia where control of energy is vital to the future and evil Communist turned evil Billionaire is planning to topple the government by obtaining the secret to cold fusion. The Saint must obtain the secret from Doctor Emma Russell (played by Elizabeth Shue).

Positives: The film does a great job with its location work, bringing to life Russia in Winter with all its cold and grittiness. Elizabeth Shue's character is pretty well-crafted, cutting against the grain of stereotypical scientists who are cold and lifeless and she's longing for something deeper and is hungry for philosophy, truth, and beauty.

Kudos to whoever did Val Kilmer's make up. In this version, Simon Templar is a master of disguise and it seems plausible that he could pull it off with how different he looks in each disguise and Kilmer's dialects are masterful.

Negatives: We can start with spending the first six minutes of the movie gratuitously showing Simon being beaten by a stereotypically overbearing priest for refusing to accept the name chosen for him as he was left at the orphanage as a nameless orphan. Will Hollywood decide this cliche is ever overdone?

In the film's second and third acts, the best it can really manage is typical action slock which is not bad but not really good either. Plus the ending drags out through senseless decompression after the resolution.

I also have to say that the film's understanding of science is dumbfounding. The formula obtained for cold fusion is incomplete, but all our heroine needs is two hours in a room without computers or anything to wrap it up. But hey, it's an action film.

The film's biggest flaw goes back to Templar. The character just isn't likable. In fact, we rarely understand why he does anything. He wants to get $50 million in his bank account to retire...why? Why $50 million? And why does he want to quit? Is he wanting to stay out of jails? Does he not like what he does and feels on some level its wrong? It's never explained.

Part of this is Kilmer who lacks any charm or charisma that actors like George Sanders or Roger Moore brought to the role. There's no swagger in Kilmer's Saint until the end by which point its too late. There's no sense of fun. It's just a guy doing a job and wanting to make money.

The other thing is the way the film was written makes the character hard to like and it's the way he seduces vulnerable women and uses them for his own ends. First, it's a passenger on the plane who just found out her husband is cheating on her and then Doctor Russell, a lonely eccentric romantic longing for something deeper. This is contrary to the original Saint films and TV shows, that while roguish, always fought on the side of angels, and left you with the impression that no innocent person had been hurt.

It would have taken magnificent performance to make such a character likable and Kilmer's mediocre performance just doesn't do it.

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31May/140

Book Review: The Saint v. Scotland Yard

The Saint, a character who remained popular for decades and has been portrayed by everyone from George Sanders and Vincent Price to Roger Moore and Val Kilmer, got his start in literature.

The Saint v. Scotland Yard  is a book published in 1932 and it collects three novellas, each featuring the Saint working outside or even against Scotland Yard, near the start of the character’s literary career . . “The Inland Revenue” sees Simon trying to shut down a blackmailer. “The Million Pound Day” pits the Saint against a ruthless gang of kidnappers who have a plan to force the printing of a million pounds in fake Italian currency. The final story, “The Melancholy Journey of Mr Teal” finds the Saint trying to steal a jewel thief’s loot before the thief's caught by Scotland Yard.

Overall, the stories are decent for the period. They’re much more adventures than they are mysteries. The cases are well-written and fun to read.

Those who know the Saint from golden age mediums like radio or the Sanders movies may not recognize much about this early version. While the Saint’s billed as the “Robin Hood” of modern crime, the Saint robs from the rich but seems more self-centered. Of course, as this was the 1930s, many people resented the rich and believed the police were corrupt or incompetent, so there was some catharsis in his antics for the common man of the day.

The brilliance of Charteris is that despite the Saint’s less than sterling conduct, he makes it really hard not to like him. The Robin Hood analogy seems inapt. The Saint in this book is really reminiscent of a romantic pirate. The Saint is a swashbuckler who laughs in the face of danger and death, and writes poetry in perilous situations. He and his girlfriend Pat are pure adrenaline junkies who get their kicks out of exposing themselves to danger which is kind of fun for people who live more tame lives.

While the Saint is no paragon in this book, he doesn’t hurt innocent people. Indeed, the book works because whoever the Saint crosses, we have a sense that they somehow deserve it.

The only other negative to this book are some unfortunate racial language which may make the book less accessible to some readers. Overall though, this was a decent early Saint novella collection.

Book Rating: 3.75 out of 5.0

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