Month: June 2013

EP0966: Sherlock Holmes: The Silver Blaze

John Gielgud
Holmes searches for a murderer and a missing horse who is favored to win a big race.

Original Air Date: March 27, 1955

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EP0965: Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Henderson Matter, Parts Three and Four

Bob Bailey

Local resistance to Johnny’s investigation of the last  Mr. Henderson’s death only makes Johnny more suspicious.

Original Air Date: November 30 and December 1, 1955

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EP0964: The Big Guy: Patent Leather Bag

Josh, Jr. and Debbie are accused of stealing a leather bag by their landlady and Josh Sharp finds himself investigating a mysterious death.

Original Air Date: October 29, 1950

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EP0963: Yours Truly Johnny Dollar: The Henderson Matter, Parts One and Two

Bob Bailey

Johnny investigates a death in a small town where it could be a suicide, murder, or accident, and the locals don’t want him to investigate.

Original Air Date: November 28 and 29, 1955

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Book Review: Trio for Blunt Instruments

Trio for Blunt Instruments was the last Nero Wolfe novella collection published during Stout’s lifetime and contained three stories.

“Kill Now-Pay Later” Originally published in 1961 sees Wolfe’s bootlack dead and suspected of murder. The police theory was that he committed suicide because he found his daughter had been sleeping around. His daughter doesn’t buy it and neither does Wolfe. Begrudgingly fears for the daughter’s safety and takes her in the brownstone.

He commits himself to solving the case. and he believes that the person who impugned the dead man’s daughter’s honor is no doubt the one behind it. His solution is to get his client to sue her co-workers and Inspector Cramer for spreading the rumor. Some great reactions from Cramer in this one.

Rating: Satisfactory

“Murder is Corny” was first published in the Novella collection and was the last novella Stout wrote.

When a mutual acquaintence of Archie’s and a murdered man tells police that she and Archie were scheduled to meet in the alley where the murdered man is found dead, Archie finds himself  in a pickle.  Wolfe at first declares himself uninterested but when Archie going to jail becomes a real possibility, he digs in.

This one could have been better, but still has the mark of a master detective story with Wolfe insisting that a bad delivery of corn to Wolfe’s house is a vital clue, one that Cramer ignores.

Rating: Satisfactory

In 1963’s “Blood Will Tell,” Archie receives a bloody tie in the mail and a mysterious phone call. When he inspires  into the case, he finds a body and a house full of people with soap operatic lives. However, unlike in the other two stories, Wolfe finds a client and has to unravel this mystery with a good bit of detective work.

Rating: Satisfactory

Overall, there were no great stories, but all of them good and solid Wolfe entries that delivered solid detection, and well-told plots with some great moments, particularly with Inspector Cramer.

Rating: Satisfactory

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EP0962: The Line Up: The Fur Flaunting Floozy

William Johnstone

Ben and Matt investigate the murder of a woman with a sordid love life.

Original Air Date: September 26, 1951

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Radio Drama Review: Tarzan and the Diamond of Asher

The first Tarzan radio serial, Tarzan of the Apes doesn’t exist in its complete form. It ran for 286 episodes from 1932-34, of which only the first 70+ are available. The Diamond of Asher is the earliest complete Tarzan serial available.

Tarzan (Carlton Kadell) has reclaimed his rightful title as a British Lord. He’s mistaken for the missing Brian Gregory and abducted. Tarzan learns that Gregory was an explorer who his captors believe hold the key to the possession of the Father of Diamonds. Tarzan escapes his captors and runs into the father and sister of Gregory who seek his aid in locating their brother.

Tarzan sets off for Africa and has to keep his party safe while facing challenges from man while dealing with intrigue from within and without his party.

Overall, this was actually a great serial, even though it had a bit of a downbeat ending. Tarzan amazed friend and foe like with his ability to handle every challenge. In many ways, the Tarzan portrayed here was a forerunner of the modern day superhero. The program featured several dialects, most of them well-done.

Tarzan and the Diamond of Asher doesn’t always live up to modern sensibilities in its dealing with racial, but there has been much worse heard in golden age productions. Tarzan himself remains humane and honorable to all. A truly great hero in a solid golden age adventure.

Overall, this is a well-written and engaging production.

Rating: 5.0 out of 5.0

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