Month: September 2012

EP0763: Let George Do It: The Common Denominator

Bob Bailley

A woman is getting premonitions prior to murders being committed and George is hired to find out what the reason is.

Original Air Date: January 28, 1952

Take our listener survey…http://survey.greatdetectives.net

Become one of our friends on Facebook… http://www.facebook.com/radiodetectives

Call 208-991-4783 to leave a voicemail.

Click here to download, click here to add this podcast to your Itunes, click here to subscribe to this podcast on Zune, click here to subscribe to this feed using any other feed reader.

EP0762: The Fat Man: The Crooked Horse

J Scott Smart

A woman hears a murder and comes to Brad for help when the room appears like it hasn’t been occupied.

Original Air Date: September 9, 1946

Take our listener survey…http://survey.greatdetectives.net

Become one of our friends on Facebook…http://facebook.com/radiodetectives

Follow us on http://www.twitter.com/radiodetectives

Click here to download, click here to add this podcast to your Itunes, click here to subscribe to this podcast on Zune, click here to subscribe to this feed using any other feed reader.

EP0761:Frank Race: The Adventure of the Juvenile Passenger

Tom Collins

A teenage girl gets a ride in the back of Marc’s taxi and threatens to commit suicide if Marc forces her out. Marc turns to Race for help.

Original Air Date:  May 7, 1949

Become one of our friends on Facebook… http://www.facebook.com/radiodetectives

Take the listener survey at http://survey.greatdetectives.net

Give us a call 208-991-4783

Follow us on Twitter @radiodetectives

Click here to download, click here to add this podcast to your Itunes, click here to subscribe to this podcast on Zune, click here to subscribe to this feed using any other feed reader.

Radio’s Most Essential People Countdown: #80-#76

Previous Posts: 81-8586-9091-9596-100

80) Arthur Godfrey

Arthur Godfrey redefined the role of radio announcers, bringing a warm, friendly, and folksy style to announcing that stood in contrast to the strict formality of many announcers. He was well-known as a morning talk show on Arthur Godfrey Time (which continued even after the golden age of radio had ended.) His human touch made him a winner with audiences, perhaps most notably his emotional reaction to the funeral procession of President Roosevelt. In addition, he was noted as the host of Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts, which quickly became America’s most popular amateur program.

79) Les Damon

Les DamonFew men landed on as many detective shows as Les Damon. He was Nick Charles in the Thin Man, The vast majority of existing Falcon recordings feature Damon. He was also Inspector Mark Sabre on ABC’s Mystery Theater,  the second Pat Abbott in NBC’s Adventures of the Abbotts, and the last Captain Kennelly on 21st Precinct. He also worked in the daytime soaps, starring in the The Right to Happiness. In addition to this, Damon made appearances in the Sci-Fi Anthologies Dimension X and X Minus One.

78) John Dehner

John Dehner had only one series lead prior to 1958. In 1958, he starred in two programs. In February, he began in Frontier Gentleman and that ended November 16th and on November 23rd he played Paladin on radio’s Have Gun Will Travel and would remain for more than two years. Dehner also starred in CBS 1952 Mystery program The Judge and auditioned for the lead in Fort Laramie. However,  Dehner’s career was ultimately defined by the countless hundreds of character roles he played from Philip Marlowe to Gunsmoke  and Lassie.  Dehner’s deep voice resonated with radio audience regardless of where it was placed. When Rod Serling made Zero Hour, the first of several radio revival attempts in the 1970s, Dehner played the lead role in the first series.

77) Robert Ripley

Ripley’s Believe it Or Not was perfect radio. For 18 years from 1930-48 Ripley brought radio listeners weird facts and oddities from around the world. Ripley took full advantage of radio’s theater of the mind as in longer version, dramatic re-enactments of the strange but true stories would be done, much to the delight of radio listeners.

76) Robert Young

Robert YoungRobert Young was best known as Jim Anderson on Father Knows Best which got its iconic start over radio in 1949. However, he was far more than that. As a film actor, he appeared in 100 films. Over radio, he took on countless roles in a variety of genres. He appeared frequently on the Lux Radio Theater. He was a  host of Maxwell House’s popular variety show The Good News of 1939.  He appeared on Suspense and of course, The Family Theatre. Young also hosted two radio dramas for the Episcopal Church in the late 1950s and early 1960s called The Witness and The Search. Throughout his career, he remained one of America’s best loved entertainer and his long radio resume reflects that.

If you enjoyed this post, you can have new posts about Detective stories and the golden age of radio and television delivered automatically to your Kindle.

Book Review: Homicide Trinity.

Homicide Trinity contained three Nero Wolfe Novellas originally published in magazine form in 1961 and 1962. Below, we take a look at each story.

“Eeny Meeny Murder Mo”

Bertha Aaron, the secretary to the Senior partner in a lawfirm comes to Wolfe’s office because she suspects one of the other partners of colluding with an opposing client against the interests of the firm. Because the opposing client is involved in a divorce case, Archie knows he’ll have a time convincing Wolfe to take the case.

Wolfe doesn’t want the case but finds himself involved when he and Archie return to the office to find Aaron murderered with Wolfe’s discarded necktie. Because it’s Wolfe’s necktie, the onus is on him to beat the police to the solution.

In some ways, this seems a variation on Disguise for Murder with Archie leaving a woman in the office and returning from the plantroom to find her murdered. They were so similar that A&E linked the two episodes for European syndication. Unfortunately, while this story has features, it’s just not as good.  Still I’ll give it a 

Rating: Satisfactory

“Death of a Demon”

Lucy Hazen shows up at Wolfe’s office and offers him $100 for an hour of his time. She wants to tell Wolfe that she wants to murder her husband and to secure Wolfe’s promise to report it to the police. Wolfe takes her upstairs to show her the orchids and while they’re upstairs, Archie hears on the radio that her husband was shot.

Lucy ends up being arrested and hiring Wolfe to find out who did it. As is the case in the best Wolfe stories, Stout creates a memorable cast of suspects in the case of the murder of the blackmailing husband and Archie finds them all at the scene of the crime looking for the box of blackmail materials.

The characters are solid, particularly for a novella, and Wolfe solves the case in true master detective fashion.

Rating: Very Satisfactory


“Counterfeit for Murder”

A woman named Hattie Anniscomes to Wolfe’s door looking quite disheveled and unlike the high value clients that Wolfe usually pays for and Archie’s not inclined to let her in. However, Archie’s willing to let her see the big guy because Wolfe is under the impression that he’s a sucker for a certain type of woman and Archie thinks it’ll be fun to show Wolfe up.  

Hattie has a stack of money that she found in her boarding house which shelters showbiz people whether they can pay their $5 a week rent or not. When Wolfe sends Archie to the boarding house to investigate, they find an undercover female Treasury Agent dead.

The cop-hating Hattie Annis is without a doubt Wolfe’s most interesting client so far. Her speech and personality (she calls Wolfe “Falstaff”) make the story one of the most enjoyable to read.

The mystery isn’t half bad either. Throw in some T-men and the NYPD in a turf war and there are Few Wolfe stories of any length that can beat this one for pure entertainment value.

Rating: Very Satisfactory

The last two stories are simply superb and as good as the vast majority of Wolfe novels. The first one is solid as well and so I’ll give this one a:

Rating: Very Satisfactory.

You can find all the Nero Wolfe books in Kindle, Audiobook, and book form on our Nero Wolfe page.

If you enjoyed this post, you can have new posts about Detective stories and the golden age of radio and television delivered automatically to your Kindle.